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Typography, Web Style

New reference for web design CSS junkies, and a nice example to demonstrate web pages need not be collections of boxes: The Elements of Typographic Style Apple to the Web:

Robert Bringhurst’s book The Elements of Typographic Style is on many a designer’s bookshelf and is considered to be a classic in the field…

In order to allay some of the myths surrounding typography on the web, I have structured this website to step through Bringhurst’s working principles, explaining how to accomplish each using techniques available in HTML and CSS. The future is considered with coverage of CSS3, and practicality is ever present with workarounds, alternatives and compromises for less able browsers.

It’s a work under progress, and as a nice touch, the author is providing an RSS feed for updates.

But it has an air or elegance, and a look of “this is not your typical web page”.

Now I am pretty far from a typographer (and today Janet in our office informed me in a page layout just what a “violator” is), but I find the explanations are really worthwhile, making the bridge when necessary from print to web design principles. You do need some modicum to substantial amount of CSS knowledge.

The one thing I am completely mystified is the use of Flash to create the front cover and the logo on every page. It does no animation or interactivity, and I can only guess the author wanted to protect the look, as it ought to be easy enough to render what is there in CSS.

Tip of the blog hat to elarningpost.

Profile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog
An early 90s builder of the web and blogging Alan Levine barks at CogDogBlog.com on web storytelling (#ds106 #4life), photography, bending WordPress, and serendipity in the infinite internet river. He thinks it's weird to write about himself in the third person.

Comments

  1. I too wonder why he did that …
    Sorry but this is totally unprofessional IMHO – talking about web typography and having a flash piece where you can have CSS+sIFR

  2. No worries about malice… especially since you make me look nicer ;-)

    I am assuming as someone with a high level of CSS experience, there is some rational rationale for putting a static log in Flash. My hunch is that to make the web site look exactly like the book we was mirroring, there was not an exact way to render the font in HTML (then again, an image might work).

    It’s a mystery, though a small one.

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