We acknowledge Steve Jobs is the master of presentations of Insanely Great Ideas. There are tons of blogs and sites extolling his mastery of simple, non bullet-point-riddled presentations and compelling stories.

Can we all be more Steve-like in our communications? As described in Steve’s Stories… (at Creating Passionate Users, great blog):

He tells a story in a way that’s easy to understand, yet compelling. The stories get you from Point A to Point B smoothly and simply. At each step along the way, he keeps focus on where this whole thing is going. He keeps his passion in the story and stays focused on the target.

Sounds simple. Nope. It’s really hard.

So it is not just wearing black, using Keynote, or just presenting with pictures only.

But there are things to learn from the Zenmaster Jobs, and while we need not imitate him, like one of those mathematical curves, we may not get to his curve, we can try approaching it.

The thing I am keying on, especially as I pick up more of this task in my role at the NMC, is about creating vibrant, active, online communities. It’s been the subject of presentations, publications, likely theses, but we are still seemingly in the guessing game of how to make these “places” truly achieve their potential.

The closing paragraph got me:

Bottom line: To create a passionate user, create a passionate community as well. When you present to that user or that community, be passionate yourself–not by overacting, but by telling a story that is spare, but compelling. Don’t be distracted by all the other stuff you want to tell. Focus on the experience that will get users the experience they want.

“spare, but compelling” and focusing on the “experience”. Hmmm, I will be mulling that, pasting it on the wall in my office.

Thanks Dan Russell for the inspiration.

Profile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog
An early 90s builder of the web and blogging Alan Levine barks at CogDogBlog.com on web storytelling (#ds106 #4life), photography, bending WordPress, and serendipity in the infinite internet river. He thinks it's weird to write about himself in the third person.

Comments

  1. Great ideas and resources Alan – thank you! As I try to share the concept of “more is less” (which I will now be “spare but compelling”) when it comes to teaching content with PowerPoint I greatly appreciate these kinds of resources and ideas.

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