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MacBookProDoorStop

Sigh, back to the seven levels of technical hell.

Nope, I have advanced beyond a code ID 10T. Just 10 minutes ago, I am talking on my telephone, watching the screen of my laptop, and it blinks/flashes twice, and the screen goes dim again,

Crikie!

I did a PMU reset, and on the start the screen only flashed bright once before starting up in its useless, dimmed screen state.

So I called my buddies at ReMac, who held my machine a week, where everyone in the store saw the same issue, until it got to Brian the Tech guy, who magically got the screen to turn on. The were helpful, but still “it has to go back to Apple” who need to see the problem before doing something. So again, for the 3rd time in 6 weeks, I am facing a period of no machine to perform my for anywhere “from a few days to 2 weeks”.

The other glimmer of hope, is if I can somehow manage to find my way into the queue of an Apple genius at our local store, and they have the power to do an “in store” replacement. That is the hitch, how to I get in line?

Apple, Apple, Apple– you are again twistin my melon, man. Making me sing like a chorus of Dvoraks.

Crikie, indeed.

Update: I shut down the laptop, went out to have dinner and a friends, and let it sit for 4-5 hours. Just for grins, I again reset the PMU, and darn if the screen did not spring back to life. On one hand, this is great, since I can use it, but worse, there is no way I can get Apple to do anything if they cannot reproduce the problem. I will just have to wait until it goes up in smoke…

Profile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog
An early 90s builder of the web and blogging Alan Levine barks at CogDogBlog.com on web storytelling (#ds106 #4life), photography, bending WordPress, and serendipity in the infinite internet river. He thinks it's weird to write about himself in the third person.

Comments

  1. seriously. skip the queue at the genius bar. walk up to the counter and demand to speak to the manager. then, demand an in-store replacement. you were sold an obvious lemon, which is a risk taken with first-gen products (like the macbook). they need to stand behind the product, take it back and deconstruct it to figure out wtf went wrong. and give you a new replacement so you’re not penalized for being an early adopter.

  2. I tend to agree with D’Arcy. You can suport you claims of problems and have ReMac’s as witmess. I would have a heart-to-heart with the manager at your local Apple store about the situation…at least then your on the Apple record. Lemon’s happen with first-gen, heck they anyway.

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