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Have You Climbed the Twitter Life Cycle Curve? George Did! Join the Club

It was with a smile I just saw the title in my RSS reader that I knew that another initial skeptic, George Siemens, had followed the path I charted in April 2007 as the Twitter Life Cycle.

Twitter Life Cycle

I have seen so many people, myself at front of the list, first see twitter and remark, “That i the stupidest thing I have ever seen on the web (well maybe after the hamsters)… who in their right mind would waste time doing this?”. If they stay at it long enough, they climb the curve above, perhaps on a different slope and maybe not alway at a plateau. But I lost track of how many colleagues I have seen who have done this.

So George’s post today inspired by to create a wiki where others can join the honorary list of People Who Climbed the Twitter Curve. So add your name today at:

http://cogdoghouse.wikispaces.com/TwitterCycle

Hmmm, I bet I will tweet this blog post..

Profile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog
An early 90s builder of the web and blogging Alan Levine barks at CogDogBlog.com on web storytelling (#ds106 #4life), photography, bending WordPress, and serendipity in the infinite internet river. He thinks it's weird to write about himself in the third person.

Comments

  1. I didn’t need to climb it, but I did find out what was on the other side on your plateau of question marks … it is intense disinterest for about six months and then it is a return at a place much higher on the graph. I was an instant Twitter hook — pushing people around me to get moving … then something happened and I stopped. ELI this year pushed me back in and I am more hooked than ever. Twitter is special.

  2. Hey Cole! It was actually you who nudged me on the first inflection point with your blog posts about twitter in January 2007. I regret I may have given D’Arcy credit in your place! What can I do to make it up?

    That’s the thing, there are all kinds of shapes of curves, divots, canyons, etc. I’ve been kind of bored by it all this week, but it comes and goes. But I live in the Kool-Aid.

  3. Gotta agree with Cole about life beyond the question marks, and with you about the comes and goes. I find that I go through some very intense Twitter cycles where it’s the best thing going, then I relax for a week or so, then back in. But it is all very intense.

  4. I’m on the curve, just under, I can’t stop.

    But I think you should turn the curve upside down. When I’m on Twitter, tt feels more like I’m sliding down a hill picking up speed.

  5. Yep, added myself in, this pretty much covers it. But I’m also worried about what lurks in those ??? When will we have the first case of Twitter cited in divorce?

  6. The captcha i something I have never seen and not even sure how it works[ it is part of SpamKarma2 and allow a comment that is close t being tagged as spam (not that I am say Jen is a spammer, it does have faulty logic) to get by. I’ve been wanting to try Akismet and disable SK2 (and the captcha).

  7. I’m currently hovering somewhere between “woah, who are these contacts?” and “twittering while on the phone”. Not sure if it will escalate to the next level seeing as I’m usually up around the room teaching, but at least I’m giving it a shot.

  8. I feel like I am still at the bottom and not yet comfortable at adding my name to the list. But twitter has been a great experiences. I am wcgaskins on twitter so shout out to me sometimes. Maybe in a few months I will reach a peak and then I will add my name to the list.

    Bill

  9. Hi Alan, I’m between the ‘I still don’t get it’ and ‘hmm, Sue Waters says its cool’ stage. I was about to blog a week ago that I was bored with Twitter but I have recently added a few more contacts so have had a little more to watch. But I haven’t seen any evidence of the ‘cool’ things that are supposed to happen on Twitter. So, verdict’s pending. cheers Sarah

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