cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by cjdaniel_

Sure, the grand we are connected world is fine for connecting actors but for my experiment to get a camera that was found on a train in Toronto back to its owners (a family in Germany)? Fail.

I have since archived and removed all of the photos from the web site I set up as a hub and left just a parting message. The site had 7000+ views and there was a good amount of retweets in twitter, with some strong effort from people in Germany. A few intrepid readers worked out the families itinerary from Germany to Chicago, based solely on camera time stamps, photos of the planes and airports.

But i still have the camera.

So I will use old school methods. There was a photo of an RV they rented in Chicago, and a business sign in the background made it easy to locate the branch of Cruise American they rented it from. I have a license plate number from another photo, so I just need to cal them, provide the info, give them my contact information, and ask them to connect the people who had rented it.

Who needs “a global network of connectedness“? Is connectedness real or just cool diagrams of sticks and balls?

I am a network failure.

But I still believe in it.

UPDATE: 10/24/2012 I called the Cruise America office and to all you smarty pants, a license plate alone is not enough to identify the vehicle rented; he needed an ID number from the back of the vehicle which never appears in the photos. He is checking the records for rentals that day (at least 3 went out( and will try and pass on my contact info.

Profile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog
An early 90s builder of the web and blogging Alan Levine barks at CogDogBlog.com on web storytelling (#ds106 #4life), photography, bending WordPress, and serendipity in the infinite internet river. He thinks it's weird to write about himself in the third person.

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