celaya mexico

Today marks the calendar lap of my grandmother’s passing in 2003. “Granny” was a one of a kind person, to me as a kid she was the emblem of someone full of life, a sense of sophistication she was always go go go. Even if my perceptions were not true to life, I still adored her, and she gave me tons of love and attention.

I believe I found that photo of hers marked “Celaya” in my Mom’s stuff. Her husband died in 1956, meaning she outlived him by 47 years. She outlived all of her brothers and sisters, her daughter (my Aunt Eve) and her son (my Dad).

She did travel as a widower, and that photo is with her and her sister Florence in Celeya, Mexico. I don’t know the year, but judging from the clothes and color tones, I would say it was late 1960s or early 1970s.

When I digitized it a few months ago, I spent a bit of time with Google Street View looking at Celaya trying to find the street they are walking on. I could not locate a Banco Comercial that matched; I saw some streets that had similar benches. It’s not critical to place it, but would have been fun.

So here I am for two weeks on my own adventure in Mexico, me in Guadalajara, and enjoying the connection as it was with my Grandma’s trip (She was not a blogger).

Recording Grandma's Stories
flickr photo shared by cogdogblog under a Creative Commons ( BY ) license

That’s all I got Granny, some photos, some audio, and a lotta memories in my heart.

This is my last photo with her, visiting I think in 2001 when she was in a nursing home. She was not quite happy there, and let everyone know. But she was still “spunky” as I liked to tease her.

Me and my grandmothers, November 2001?
Me and my grandmother, November 2001?

Hola, Abuela!

The post "En México, Recordando a mi Abuela" was originally scraped from the bottom of the pickel barrel at CogDogBlog (http://cogdogblog.com/2015/07/recordando-mi-abuela/) on July 12, 2015.

1 Comment

  • chimekin

    “Banco de comercio” was rebranded as “Bancomer” at early 90’s, maybe is still there, even though i don’t think buildings are the same, up until the 80s we had no respect for historical value of private buildings, the only remaining buildings with that style are almost entirely the public ones

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