CogBlogged in ‘2014’

When You think That Tech Is More Awesome Than Possible, yet…

Flash! Poof! I thought I just discovered a hidden search gem in my OS X Mavericks system. One of the coolest things in Evernote is uploaded photos with text in the picture, becomes searchable for those words (it does some magic OCR on your images). Now that is magic. This morning I was seeking an image on my computer that I as not sure is there– I had used it on a post about the saying “The cobbler’s children have no shoes”. On a whim I put “cobbler” into the Spotlight search in the finder. I did not find the image I was looking for (insert Star Wars robots reference), but was surprised that an image titled IMG_9119.JPG would appear on the search result- in a photo with the word “cobbler” in the picture. Before I got excited and tweeting like a proud papa, I wanted to check a few […]

(see the full barking...)

Grasping for the Holy Comment Grail

creative commons licensed ( BY-SA ) flickr photo shared by RobotSkirts Blog comments. Once the only social network, the way we conversed among blogs, wikis in the pre-twitter, pre-facebook era. It was, really, where the interaction happened. Now, thanks to Google providing the link bait incentive, blog comments are the honey pots for bot gibberish; Akismet snags some 10,000 spam comments per week on this site. But they are still rather important in Connected Courses– nothing, absolutely nothing, motivates someone new to blogging, reflecting in their own space than getting feedback. Especially when it comes from a person they do not know. It cracks open the “why” of what may appear to be pointless blabbering. We seek to be hear, to be acknowledged. Blog comments do that in a simple, but effective way. There is, and has been, for a long time a desire to be able to “track” comment […]

(see the full barking...)

This is How My Health Insurance “Works”

Unlike many tea partiers I’ve been pleased with my experience getting ACA Healthcare (get the name right, willya, labeling it ObamaCare gives your bias away). I found the signup smooth, and have had above par service when I have called them with questions. As a self-employed Type 1 Diabetic, without it, I’d likely be (a) without healthcare or (b) without a home for the cost of care the TPers would leave me with. For a shade under the monthly cost I paid until March 2014 for a COBRA insurance plan (it expired), I was able to get a comparable Blue Cross / Blue Shield health care plan plus a Cigna Delta insurance one. I kept my doctors, but had to shift to a different prescription provider. By the way, this is costing me, out of my pocket, $500 per month. Please thank your employer, give them a hug, for covering […]

(see the full barking...)

Farewell Cadu

creative commons licensed ( BY-SA ) flickr photo shared by cogdogblog I got the sad news today from my ex that Cadu has left this earth. This loyal black lab was the sister of Mickey, the brown lab who stands in for me on my various avatars and this web site banner. We got both puppies in 2001, partly as a means of getting over the loss of a predecessor dog, MC Fudge. creative commons licensed ( BY-SA ) flickr photo shared by cogdogblog Her name was chosen as a shortened version of Caduceus, the staff of Hermes that is the symbol of medicine, of health. Metaphorically, of the healing of the loss of Fudge. The irony was that as a puppy, Cadu was really sick! She was lethargic for a puppy, lost a lot of fur, and overweight. But thanks to the staff of Hermes and our veterinarian, she […]

(see the full barking...)

Wondering about Wonder at UT Arlington

I will be first to say today’s invited talk at the UT Arlington LINK Research Lab was my own trip through the Time Tunnel, with the year 1989 dialed in. An archive of the talk is available — here are el slides A bit of a mashup of some earlier ones on Enquire Within and True Stories of Open Sharing, the title I came up with was Do You Ever Wonder Whatever Happened to Wonder?. This itself set off my own associative trails of the way Andy Rooney used to whine on 60 Minutes, “Did you every notice…” (he always seemed to be Enquiring About). That in itself led me to reflect on how much my formative years was shaped by this technology: And then, almost by sheer serendipity, I came across last week this mint gem. This 1993 episode of “Computer Chronicles” introduces it’s audiences to this thing called […]

(see the full barking...)

I am a Smart-Ass

Published tonight on medium.com – am still finding my way around the writing space. I find it makes me actually go over my words like 4 or 5 times rather than my typo-ridden blurt here. But anyhow, the real truth behind the origin of the Internet I am a Smart-Ass (the Internet was built for me) I could have just as well written it here. And I just was about to publish and was looking at what I had blogged here– I kind of grumble at some people who write in one place with just a link elsewhere. This was a post idea that literally came to me in the shower, though I am pretty sure I’ve written parts of this in some aspect here. But it is one of those cases where most of the blogging takes place away from the blog– in my head. There is always more […]

(see the full barking...)

My God– It’s Full of CMOOCs!

I thought this image was a clever idea, but it may not be quite apparent. I have replaced Dave from 2001 A Space Odyssey with a montage/collage/frommage of George Siemens (image source) and Stephen Downes (image source). Why? Of course, together they spawned the first cMOOC, CCK08, which really ought to be for Canadian Massive Open Online Course. You see, what I asked for in Seeking Syndicated / Distributed / Connected Course Examples already has a name. They are the cMOOCs of the original stardust formation. From the MOOC Guide… The Connectivism and Connective Knowledge course (CCK08) was the first to incorporate open learning with distributed content, making it the first true MOOC… What this means is that course content is not located in one place, but may be located anywhere on the web. The course therefore consists of sets of connections linking the content together into a single network. […]

(see the full barking...)

Seeking Syndicated / Distributed / Connected Course Examples

creative commons licensed ( BY-SA ) flickr photo shared by cogdogblog Maybe it’s the ramp up of Connected Courses but it’s also some upcoming presentations that made my slap my had with a loud “DOH”. I want to create a collection of examples of (and here is where I mumble because I do not know what to call them) how about DS106ish courses– ones using a distributed participation model but also using syndication/push technology to collect or aggregate activity in one place. I know my own examples, all framed around the WordPress / Feed WordPress structure I’ve been deep in since ds106, but also have built out maybe 7 others (and another in the works this week). But others have done this same thing (UMW Abroad has posts back to 2009), in other platforms (all of the cMOOCs Stephen Downes fostered with gRSShopper (Hey Stephen, I thought you had a […]

(see the full barking...)

Unpawning Flickr Notes

creative commons licensed ( BY ) flickr photo shared by StockMonkeys.com Hey! Stand up, code up, hack up! Just because [fill in the blank of your favorite web service that yanked the chain on a feature you adored] took away a feature, you are not powerless. One of my long running favorite flickr features was the ability to annotate part of an image with notes, like making an interactive diagram — like this one, which is in my top most viewed flickr images. creative commons licensed ( BY-SA ) flickr photo shared by cogdogblog In the past, you could hover over part of the diagram, and a text bubble would appear with an explanation and a hypertext link. This is an insanely useful tool for teachers. I can think of few subjects that you cannot find a use for annotating an image or diagram. Or, as I did as one […]

(see the full barking...)

What’s [Not] in Your Feed Channel?

While RSS is still a dying technology, I offer some insight into its innards. If the mundane details of feed data make you queasy, carry on. If you want to know what’s going on under the hood of your blog and the Connected Courses syndication hub, then trudge on. This started with a reasonable request from Liz Dorland, a colleague I’ve known since my mullet headed days at Maricopa @cogdog Our friend @rheyden pointed out my blog link on #ccourses borked. URL text shows, not blog name. Doh! Help! http://t.co/LFFRT4Ai26 — Liz Dorland=Chimera (@ldinstl_chimera) September 9, 2014 So here is the thing, the list of all syndicated blogs on the site is automatically generated from the RSS feed for each blog, so the title of the blog and the link are ones provided by the blog itself. There are two main parts of an RSS feed- there is the “Channel” […]

(see the full barking...)