CogBlogged in ‘2014’

Taking the Hunt for OER Reuse to the Waters

creative commons licensed ( BY-NC-SA ) flickr photo shared by Lope® Having stomped around the forest for almost a week and finding no stories of OER Reuse but whispers and a few broken limbs, I am going to aim my search at the waters. The photos ore just as blurry and the doubters and skeptics just as mocking. What little bits have come from the forest include: David Kernohan shared some JORUM User Stories and JISC Case Studies on OERs Lisa M Lane looked far and wide among her shared open content and found nary a nibble of reuse. Laura Gibbs shared a detailed summary of her practices of using/sharing open content Simon Thompson alluded to some direct evidence @cogdog how about the fact I used this: http://t.co/JgtVqvxmla as a basis for this: https://t.co/xLra9vvPkB — Simon Thomson (@digisim) July 21, 2014 Here’s the thing. These are all useful and appreciated […]

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It’s Not Amazing When the Web Forgets You

In prepping my recent call for OER Reuse Stories (which, ahem, I have collected a grand total of ZERO new ones) I was reviewing the original ones I collected the first time I did an Amazing Stories talk on 2009. By the way, that site still works despite using a defunct CoolIris embed. In going through my hard drive, I actually found a story I had recorded my self in 2009, about some things that happened some 10 years earlier. For some reason I never published the story. But as listened again, beyond cringing at watching myself on video (yes, all humans do that) the story seemed timely given the recent Reclaim Hackathon in LA. A true pioneer in web multimedia, a career at the peak in the late 1990s, dies before his time in 2001. By 2005 most of his work has vanished from the web, and by 2014, […]

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Stalking the Mythical OER Reuse: Seeking Non Blurry Videos

OERs. People build them. People house them in repositories. People do journal articles, conference presentations, research on them. I doubt never their existence. But the ultimate thing they are supposed to support, maybe their raison d’être– the re use by other educators, what do we have to show for that except whispered stories, innuendo, and blurry photos in the forest? I am on the case. Yes, I am looking for True Stories of OER Reuse. Big data, metrics, meta data, those are only like those casts of big feet. The only way to know of reuse is to tell it. So I am adding to my True Stories of Open Sharing a special wing to house True Stories of OER Reuse. I see two varieties of possible stories: You have created, shared an OER, and you have a story of how someone else has used it? YES, I would love […]

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Google Licensed For Reuse Image Search: Not All is As it Seems

creative commons licensed ( BY-NC-ND ) flickr photo shared by capitphil I am searching for images almost every day for blog posts, media projects; always seeking the ones licensed for re-use. I spent some time recently building a Mozilla Teaching Kit for this practice. My go to tool is usually Compfight to search the creative commons licensed images from flickr, but I am also reaching into the ones Google Images claims are licensed for reuse. I even made a little browser quick search so I can do it in one motion. Most of the results come from places that clearly provide open licensing options- flickr, Wikimedia Commons, Deviant Art, pixabay. But I am suspicious all is not kosher in the results. Today I was looking for an image used in my last post to represent “feeding the machine” – in my mind I imagined an image of someone shoveling coal […]

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Feed WordPress 101: Feeding The Machine

creative commons licensed ( BY-NC-SA ) flickr photo shared by Mr Michael This is part 3 of 5 in a series of posts for Building Connected Courses: Feed WordPress 101 Basic Concepts of Syndication – and what to think about even before you touch that WordPress thing Installing and Setting up Feed WordPress – Minimal settings, and planning the way content is sliced, diced, and recombined »» Feeding the Machine «« – How to get RSS feeds into the aggregator without losing a finger Some Feed Magic – Optional ways to improve feeds from sites such as flickr, twitter, etc, creating a twitter archive, RSS Feed TLC Some WordPress Extras – adding attribution, setting featured images, shortcodes At the end of our last section on setting up Feed WordPress, we reviewed the basic process for adding a site to our aggregator. In this post, I explore this farther, because, while […]

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Like a Leatherman for Your WordPress Blog

creative commons licensed ( BY ) flickr photo shared by brian.ch I have a tool… well it might not be quite as good as a Leatherman, but I use it almost every day to search my blog. And I built it 9 years ago. If you cannot wade through my story just go there. But this is a case where conceptual understanding, and not dutiful “all I will do is click buttons” mindset comes in handy. It came from knowing how to read URLs. If you ever search on a WordPress blog, you may notice a pattern in the results. The URL always look like http://somecoolblog.org/index.php?s=cotton+candy — it’s just the search terms, with “+” replacing ant spaces tacked on to the main URL as a parameter. So without even visiting his blog, I can run a search on Bavatuesdays like http://bavatuesdays.com/index.php?s=Alan+Levine+best+blog+ever just to see how much love Jim is giving […]

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10 Years, 38,000 Photos, 1 Explore

How about that, my very first photo goes into flickr Explore I’ve hung 38,000 photos in flickr since 2004, stayed with flickr, even defended it despite all of the Yahoo’d changes (though I did call them an ass). And not even for a photo I would call my best (I keep my favorites over at Barking Dog Studio)- it was actually done without much thought. After yesterday’s mid afternoon rain, at dusk I was relaxing on the porch and noticed some nifty pink cloud patterns. I snapped two images with my iPhone (locking the exposure on the orange part of the sky). The photo was ok, but it really popped alive when I opened it in the Snapseed app and applied the HDR effect (and probably a bit of contrast and saturation boost). I do like the effect, it brought almost a tube like line of color almost flowing between […]

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Feed WordPress 101: Installing and Setting Up The Machine

creative commons licensed ( BY-SA ) flickr photo shared by cogdogblog This is part 2 of 5 in a series of posts for Building Connected Courses: Feed WordPress 101. Basic Concepts of Syndication – and what to think about even before you touch that WordPress thing »» Installing and Setting up Feed WordPress «« – Minimal settings, and planning the way content is sliced, diced, and recombined Feeding the Machine – How to get RSS feeds into the aggregator without losing a finger Some Feed Magic – Optional ways to improve feeds from sites such as flickr, twitter, etc, creating a twitter archive, RSS Feed TLC Some WordPress Extras – adding attribution, setting featured images, shortcodes In the previous section, we planned out a structure for our syndicated content. Now let’s plugin the machine and twiddle a few dials. If you like documentation, check the wiki on the developer’s site. […]

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Feed WordPress 101: The Basics

creative commons licensed ( BY-NC-SA ) flickr photo shared by cathywitch This is part 1 of 5 in a series of posts for Building Connected Courses: Feed WordPress 101 »» Basic Concepts of Syndication «« – and what to think about even before you touch that WordPress thing Installing and Setting up Feed WordPress – Minimal settings, and planning the way content is sliced, diced, and recombined Feeding the Machine – How to get RSS feeds into the aggregator without losing a finger Some Feed Magic – Optional ways to improve feeds from sites such as flickr, twitter, etc, creating a twitter archive, RSS Feed TLC Some WordPress Extras – adding attribution, setting featured images, shortcodes Why Bother? If you have gone this far, you’ve likely already made a decision to run a course or community in a distributed manner. Why would you do this when your institution provides a […]

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Building Connected Courses: Feed WordPress 101

This is the first in a series of posts meant as a guide for almost anyone to create a WordPress site that operates as a networked hub for content created elsewhere. This is the engine, the Jim Groom Syndication Bus that drives ds106, the Open Digital Storytelling course/community/space. It is intended primarily for Connected Courses, which is intended to be offered in October-November 2014 as an open course in how to create open courses. I have built several of these sites in the last few years, after learning how it works with ds106, such as ETMOOC (Educational Technology MOOC), Project Community (The Hague University of Applied Science), Harvard Future of Learning Institute, rmooc (Thompson Rivers University), and most recently Thought Vectors in Concept Space (UNIV 200 at VCU). All of these sites are different, themes, pupose, kinds of syndicated content, but they are all are powered by WordPress and the […]

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